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YOUNG PEOPLE'S EMOTIONAL HEALTH

At least one in four of us will experience problems at some point in our lives.  Although mental health issues are relatively common, it is often the case that children and young people don’t get the help they need as quickly as they should. As a result, mental health difficulties such as anxiety, low mood, depression, conduct disorders and eating disorders can stop some young people achieving what they want in life and making a full contribution to society.

 

TALK ABOUT YOUR FEELINGS.

Here is a short video from the Mental Health Foundation.

Talking about your feelings isn’t a sign of weakness. It’s part of taking charge of your wellbeing and doing what you can to stay healthy.
Talking can be a way to cope with a problem you’ve been carrying around in your head for a while. Just being listened to can help you feel supported and less alone. And it works both ways. If you open up, it might encourage others to do the same.
It’s not always easy to describe how you’re feeling. If you can’t think of one word, use lots. What does it feel like inside your head? What does it make you feel like doing?

 

LOOKING AFTER YOUR EMOTIONAL & WELLBEING TIPS.

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DRINK SENSIBLY

We often drink alcohol to change our mood. Some people drink to deal with fear or loneliness, but the effect is only temporary.
When the drink wears off, you feel worse because of the way alcohol withdrawal symptoms affect your brain and the rest of your body. Drinking is not a good way to manage difficult feelings.
Apart from the damage too much alcohol can do to your body, you would need more and more alcohol each time to feel the same short-term boost. There are healthier ways of coping with tough times.
Occasional light drinking is perfectly healthy and enjoyable for most people.

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EAT WELL

There are strong links between what we eat and how we feel, for example, caffeine and sugar can have an immediate effect.

But food can also have a long-lasting effect on your mental health. Your brain needs a mix of nutrients to stay healthy and function well, just like the other organs in your body.

A diet that’s good for your physical health is also good for your mental health.

A healthy balanced diet includes:

  • lots of different types of fruit and vegetables

  • wholegrain cereals or bread

  • nuts and seeds

  • dairy products

  • oily fish

  • plenty of water.

  • Eat at least three meals each day and drink plenty of water. Try to limit how many high-caffeine or sugary drinks you have, and avoid too much alcohol.

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KEEP ACTIVE

Experts believe exercise releases chemicals in your brain that make you feel good. Regular exercise can boost your self-esteem and help you concentrate, sleep, look and feel better.
Exercise also keeps the brain and your other vital organs healthy. Remember that you do not have to join a gym in order to be active. Taking walks in your local park, riding a bike or going swimming to playing games like 'Just Dance' on your games console at home.

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ACCEPT WHO YOU ARE

Some of us make people laugh, some are good at maths, others cook fantastic meals. Some of us share our lifestyle with the people who live close to us, others live very differently.

We’re all different. It’s much healthier to accept that you’re unique than to wish you were more like someone else.

Feeling good about yourself boosts your confidence to learn new skills, visit new places and make new friends.

Good self-esteem helps you cope when life takes a difficult turn. 

Be proud of who you are. Recognise and accept what you are not good at, but focus on what you can do well.

Work out if there’s anything about yourself that you still want to change. Are your expectations realistic? If they are, work towards the change in small steps

 

WHERE CAN  I GET SUPPORT?

To get support the first step is telling someone how you feel. I know how much courage it takes to speak up when you are struggling. There are so many different organisations that can offer you support, whether you're questioning your gender or sexuality, experiencing thoughts of suicide or just supporting someone you're worried about.

 

MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

KOOTH

Kooth is your online mental wellbeing community. Kooth offers emotional and mental health support for children and young people aged between 11 – 24 years and is available up to 10pm every day.

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NHS FIRST RESPONSE

111 will tell you the right place to get help if you need to see someone. Use the NHS 111 online service, or call 111. You may be able to speak to a nurse, or mental health nurse, over the phone.

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CALM

Campaign Against Living Miserably, or CALM, is a registered charity based in England. CALM run a free, confidential and anonymous helpline as well as a webchat service, offering help, advice and information to anyone who is struggling or in crisis.

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The Mind charity provide advice and support to empower anyone experiencing a mental health problem. Mind campaigns to improve services, raise awareness and promote understanding. Mind won't give up until everyone experiencing a mental health problem gets support and respect.

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Read through a list of charities, organisations and support groups run by volunteers that can help you or someone you know with their mental health.

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